Presentation – Preparation, Or Panic?

“I never prepare for presentations, I just wing it.” I often hear this said about presentations and I’m not entirely sure I believe this statement. At least, not about successful presentations.

As for those who are clearly flailing, then perhaps all preparation has been forgotten in favour of nerves. But only the supremely confident will make the statement above, and even then there must have been some elements of preparation, if only being sure that prior experience combined with good industry and audience knowledge are enough.

How do you prepare?

Do you panic?

Do you rehash your last presentation? What if it didn’t work the last time? Is it simply a case of fingers crossed and hope for the best?

Do you write some PowerPoint slides around your subject and then plan out what you’ll say afterwards?

These methods are a bit like playing Pin the Tail on the Donkey. You might hit the spot, but you might not. Your audience will certainly let you know that you haven’t if you fail to prepare properly. It’s also unfair to lead them on a mystery tour if you’re rambling through PowerPoint slides with no clear path.

The key to preparation is to know beforehand what you want to achieve from your presentation.

What do you want your final outcome to be? More signups to courses? Knowledge transfer? Whatever this goal is, write it in big letters, stick it on a wall where you can easily see it and ensure every aspect of your presentation can be justified by that goal. Just as all projects need a business case, so do your presentations.

You also need to be able to gauge your success criteria for your presentation and this also requires preparation. Do you want quantifiable or qualified results? How will you measure your success? Can you relate it all to your desired results easily?

If you prepare carefully for a presentation and think carefully about the results you want to achieve with the audience you have then your presentation should be successful and fun. If you simply wing it; then prepare for your credibility to fly out of the window…

Buyer’s Guide: 5 Incredible Baby Shower Presents

Baby showers are as usual as birthday events. You are to attend one from time to time. While that is not a problem, selecting the best present for the expectant might definitely be one. Right here we have five of the most awesome concepts to consist of in your present registry for moms-to-be, to impress every time!

Mommy’s Me-Time Supplies

If you have had a kid, you will know why this one topped the list. While baby shower presents are mostly for the new baby, the thing moms really value is something for themselves, to make them feel vital too. When the baby comes, everything will become a challenge for her. She will then thank you much more for the time you thought of her. Include pamper items, day spa passes, aroma therapy oils, cozy bathrobe, and everything else you can think that she might require.

Baby Diapers and Changing Goods

It is undoubtedly the most clich├ęd present for a baby shower, however it never ever goes unappreciated. No parents can refute exactly how vital the baby diapers are. You can be a bit innovative, and make a diaper cake or something else to present your present. You can also include other products required for changing time to fill your present basket.

Cost savings Bonds for Future

This is another present that can never ever go wrong. The kid will ultimately pass the diaper age and mature, and your present will come in helpful even long after that. Doing this, you are also spending for the kid’s future, with a belief in the parents and their parenting capabilities.

Present Certificates

If you are way too confused about what to get and what not, you can always get some present certifications, so that the parents can get what they want to have. Your selections become restricted when the parents set a present registry. If there is no such obligation, you can offer them with shopping choices for regular child requirements in child stores, to play safe.

Toy Pacifier Holder

If your plan is to stand apart off the crowd with a special yet budget-friendly present, make sure that you get one of those stuffed toy pacifier holders. It is a stuffed toy with a pacifier connected to it, to keep the kid calm. You can get the one that allows any types of pacifiers to be connected instead of a particular kind. You can include a couple of even more products to accompany the pacifier holder which parents would definitely love and make use of for a some time!

Being Present – Improving Your Life With Mindfulness Practice

Whenever I start to talk about mindfulness practice with my clients, I tend get a lot of blank stares or resistance. Generally, I think people picture a Buddhist monk engaged in seated meditation for hours or weeks on end. Actually, mindfulness is a very simple practice that is easily integrated into our everyday lives. You can even do it while you’re washing dishes!

What is Mindfulness practice?

A great definition is provided by well-known researcher and founder of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, Jon Kabat-Zinn, mindfulness is paying attention on purpose in the moment without grasping onto judgment. That is, intentionally noticing present experience without labeling it as good or bad. Simple, yes. Easy, no.

It takes a lot of practice to pay attention to the moment. Our minds naturally wander. For instance, how often do you actually pay attention to the experience of washing the dishes or for that matter, playing with your children? Never? You wouldn’t be alone. We’re raised to multitask in our current day society. You wash dishes while going over your day, talking to your kids or partner, planning for tomorrow, etc. Imagine for a moment what it would be like to really experience washing the dishes. Feel the temperature of the water. Notice the smell and feel of the soap running over your hands. See the bubbles. Hear the sound of the running water or the clink of the dishes. What emotions arise? What thoughts come up?

Why bother with mindfulness practice?

The benefits are nearly endless. According to another well-known expert and author of numerous books including The Mindful Brain, Dan Siegel, M.D., research indicates that meditation or mindfulness practice has significant effects on the body, mind and even relationships. Dr. Herbert Benson, author of the Relaxation Response and president of the Mind/Body Institute at Harvard reports that scientific evidence shows that the relaxed state achieved through meditation can lower blood pressure, heart rate and respiration. It reduces anxiety, anger, hostility and depression. It alleviates insomnia, premenstrual syndrome, hot flashes and infertility. It has also been used successfully to treat individuals with chronic pain. It increases emotional balance and mental flexibility, which helps to overcome emotional pain, compulsions and addictions. It improves concentration and mental clarity. It enhances insight and empathy. It improves our intuitive ability and provides us with a heightened sense of connectedness to others and the world. Relationships improve when we are able to be more present with people and less caught up in fantasy, projection or negative emotions that get in the way of successful communication. Researchers have also found that meditators report increased life satisfaction and optimism. All that without a pill? Who wouldn’t want to try it?

How is Mindfulness Practice done?

Mindfulness is a state of mind rather than a specific activity. There are many paths to mindfulness. It is important to choose a method that works for you! In order for it to work it has to be enjoyable (or at least something you’re willing to practice). It has to fit into your schedule. It has to be something you can do. Don’t take an ashtanga vinyasa yoga class if you’re out of shape and have never taken a basic yoga class. Don’t sign up for a week long meditation retreat if you’ve never meditated five minutes. Start small.

Yoga, Tai chi, Chi Gong, and various forms of Meditation are wonderful options to begin to train your mind to pay attention. But, Mindfulness doesn’t have to be a formal practice. There are endless opportunities to practice mindfulness throughout your day. You can wash dishes, go for a walk, play with your kids, be with your partner, take a bath, eat a meal, etc. The point is to pay attention, notice when your mind wanders, and gently bring your attention back to the experience of the moment. It’s as simple as that.